Posts Tagged ‘littlelawlinks’

Daily Little Law Links

November 9th, 2009
  • There is a discussion progressing that Rupert Merdoch, the media overlord, will begin to charge for all his outlets’ online content.  The new development is a story in the FT today that he has some robust plans to protect this content once access is restricted.  It sounds like a boon for some lawyers, as News Corp. produces a lot of content.  http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/ab874200-cd28-11de-a748-00144feabdc0.html?ftcamp=rss
{lang: 'en-GB'}

Daily Little Law Links

November 6th, 2009

Welcome to the start of what seems to be a very damp weekend here in north London.

  • First, this report is a clue to what will form the next Cases That Changed Our World… Carlill v Carbolic Smoke Ball Company.  Yes, I groaned too (for non-law readers, this is one of the first cases taught on a law degree course), but reading down I gained some insightful trivia.  I did not know that Mrs Carlill died in 1942, aged 96 of… irony, possibly.  I wonder if her family know how famous she is?   http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/8340276.stm
  • Staying with the BBC, another story about abuse of RIPA (Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000, or the ‘we-thought-1984-was-a-manual-for-goverment’ law, as I think of it) talks about The Investigatory Powers Tribunal, which I confess to never having heard of.  As their website seems to suggest they have heard five cases, perhaps that’s unsurprising.  http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/dorset/8343865.stm
  • More politics than law, but I did enjoy Guido gloating that the guy he got sacked ended up having to pay for Guido to travel down and frustrate him further because he served the papers.  I also think the Prime Minister under cross examination would be wonderful legal theatre.  http://order-order.com/2009/11/06/nadine-v-hm-government/
{lang: 'en-GB'}

Daily Little Law Links

November 4th, 2009
  • Following on from yesterday’s prediction, the suspects in the Italian Rendition case were found guilty in absentia. http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/world/europe/article6903439.ece
  • The Conservative Party’s proposed change to strike ballots needing to be a majority of eligible voters, not just of those that voted has some of the unions spooked  (http://www.unionstogether.org.uk/page/s/fightback), and probably for good reason as the actions I’ve been involved with probably wouldn’t have passed this test.*
  • Finally, the BBC get another thumbs up from me for The Cases That Changed Our World on Radio 4 this evening.  It discussed a case of two Quakers on trial in 1670 that had a unique kind of jury-tampering; the judge threatening to kill a member of the jury.   It was the first of four programmes.

I am studiously avoiding the Conservative announcement on Europe and a discussion about Parliamentary supremacy, as there is nothing little about it.  I think I’ll save myself the effort of dusting off Bradley until there are some signs that I am not my only reader.  I’ll leave it at referring both the BBC and Mr Cameron to Chapter 8, as I have the impression both could do with a refresher.

*Spotted on Luke’s Blog whose opinions I enjoy having a private grumble about most mornings.

{lang: 'en-GB'}