Posts Tagged ‘international’

The Death Penalty

December 29th, 2009

I wanted to comment on today’s execution, and link to a wider discussion about how the death penalty has no part to play in civilised world, but as is often the case Amnesty have made the case much more eloquently.  Read here.

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Daily Little Law Links

November 30th, 2009
  • Apparently, it doesn’t matter if you own it, you still can’t park on it.  Property Law in a nutshell really.
  • Amnesty predict that the Swiss are heading to the European Court of Human Rights because of the minaret vote.
  • You have to wonder whether staff at the FCO hide under their desks when they see a story like this break. Wishing them a safe and speedy return.
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Daily Little Law Links

November 28th, 2009

A theme of people who probably should not have been caught is the thread today.

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Daily Little Law Links

November 27th, 2009
  • I was captivated by Sir Jeremy Greenstock’s testimony at the Iraq Inquiry today.  It really was a short lecture on customary international law.  The FT describes it well, but the full transcript is already online here.
  • The Police have had a troubled week. Firstly, The Guardian questions how essential stop-and-search was if it has now been reduced by a third.
  • Then, the National Audit Office released a report staying that solicitors suspect the police deter suspects from accessing their (free) services.
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Daily Little Law Links

November 21st, 2009
  • Tesco seem to want to reignite the row about how much personal data they hold by suggesting it could be used as a credit reference tool.
  • The Telegraph looks at which sections of t he Fraud Act 2006 may apply when prosecuting MPs for false expense claims.
  • The row over the jurisdiction of the ICC will again be tested, this time as Amnesty insist that if the President of Sudan accepts an invitation to Denmark, he should be arrested.  I think Omar al Bashir will have the sense not to test the theory in a European country.
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Daily Little Law Link

November 19th, 2009

Just one link today, because it is much better than I would write and deserves your full attention.

This is Reprieve’s opinion on the case of Binyam Mohamed v FCO. 

Stunning.

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Daily Little Law Links

November 17th, 2009
  • The deal that will allow Google to reproduce the content of out-of-print books has been discussed in depth by lawyers.  In The Times today, two likely users share their views.
  • Any discussion about international development has its routes in the establishment of the rule of law.  Transparency International have published their Corruption Index 2009, with Somalia, Afghanistan, Iraq,  Sudan and Myanmar racing to the bottom of the table.
  • On a more light-hearted note, my favourite blogging barrister Babybarista brings new technology to an old master.
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Daily Little Law Links

November 16th, 2009
  • The IAEA report today seems to pose more questions than it answers about Iran’s nuclear programme. The New York Times writes in detail.
  • The Times is right to observe that the government’s plan to interfere with bonus payments raises many questions about privity of contract (usually only those who make an agreement can enforce it) and retroactive legislation (an act should not become illegal after it has been done legally). That is if there is a banker brave enough to challenge it.
  • The very readable Iain Dale writes today about an idea that the Press Complaints Commission wants to regulate blogs. If the PCC are as ineffectual towards blogs as they are to the rest of the media, Iain has nothing to fear.

Using the most tenuous of legal links, I am just going to point your attention skyward – the Space Shuttle Atlantis launched today, in one of its final flights before it is retired next year. From next year, the U.S. has made an agreement to use the Russian Soyuz rockets to get to the Space Station, as a cost of $50m a seat. I bet that was a fun contract to draft.

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Daily Little Law Links

November 14th, 2009
  • The BNP, so keen on publicity that they have barred journalists from their conference, passed a motion to extend their membership criteria in response to the High Court ruling that their old policy contravened the Race Relations Act 1973.  The full (presumably second hand) story is in The Guardian.
  • Stories like this are the best case for the International Criminal Court. If those involved they were likely to be tried by an independent international body, it would be a far more effective deterrent than a court martial.
  • Surely lots of extra points for the lawyer who can show that Simon Cowell is liable for this story in The Telegraph.
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Daily Little Law Links

November 10th, 2009
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