Posts Tagged ‘contract’

Daily Little Law Links

June 30th, 2010

In a disappointing fudge, it looks like 28 days detention without trail is here to stay, at least for another 6 months.

As a law student, I have a pretty high tolerance for reading nonsense, but I confess that I am often guilty of a thoughtless “click here to show you have read and agree to our terms and conditions” when I have (at best) scanned the headings.  Apparently, I am not alone – it seems the Financial Services Authority agrees with my approach.

‘Emails are as private as postcards’ – trite but sound advice.  Or should that be ‘fully search-able postcards that will later be used as evidence against you’?  Surely the thousands of emails that go back and forth everyday within organisations make it impossible to use email as a practical investigative tool, right?  Not if you know what phrases to look for, as the former CEO of Lehman Brothers discovered.

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Daily Little Law Links

November 16th, 2009
  • The IAEA report today seems to pose more questions than it answers about Iran’s nuclear programme. The New York Times writes in detail.
  • The Times is right to observe that the government’s plan to interfere with bonus payments raises many questions about privity of contract (usually only those who make an agreement can enforce it) and retroactive legislation (an act should not become illegal after it has been done legally). That is if there is a banker brave enough to challenge it.
  • The very readable Iain Dale writes today about an idea that the Press Complaints Commission wants to regulate blogs. If the PCC are as ineffectual towards blogs as they are to the rest of the media, Iain has nothing to fear.

Using the most tenuous of legal links, I am just going to point your attention skyward – the Space Shuttle Atlantis launched today, in one of its final flights before it is retired next year. From next year, the U.S. has made an agreement to use the Russian Soyuz rockets to get to the Space Station, as a cost of $50m a seat. I bet that was a fun contract to draft.

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Daily Little Law Links

November 6th, 2009

Welcome to the start of what seems to be a very damp weekend here in north London.

  • First, this report is a clue to what will form the next Cases That Changed Our World… Carlill v Carbolic Smoke Ball Company.  Yes, I groaned too (for non-law readers, this is one of the first cases taught on a law degree course), but reading down I gained some insightful trivia.  I did not know that Mrs Carlill died in 1942, aged 96 of… irony, possibly.  I wonder if her family know how famous she is?   http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/8340276.stm
  • Staying with the BBC, another story about abuse of RIPA (Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000, or the ‘we-thought-1984-was-a-manual-for-goverment’ law, as I think of it) talks about The Investigatory Powers Tribunal, which I confess to never having heard of.  As their website seems to suggest they have heard five cases, perhaps that’s unsurprising.  http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/dorset/8343865.stm
  • More politics than law, but I did enjoy Guido gloating that the guy he got sacked ended up having to pay for Guido to travel down and frustrate him further because he served the papers.  I also think the Prime Minister under cross examination would be wonderful legal theatre.  http://order-order.com/2009/11/06/nadine-v-hm-government/
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