Archive for November, 2009

Daily Little Law Links

November 30th, 2009
  • Apparently, it doesn’t matter if you own it, you still can’t park on it.  Property Law in a nutshell really.
  • Amnesty predict that the Swiss are heading to the European Court of Human Rights because of the minaret vote.
  • You have to wonder whether staff at the FCO hide under their desks when they see a story like this break. Wishing them a safe and speedy return.
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A Bare Flat

November 30th, 2009

After a wet and wild day, I slouched down over my PC to complete my daily search for interesting legal snippets and I have failed.  Across the range of newspapers, agencies and bloggers’ sites I frequent for your reading pleasure I have absolutely nothing to report.

So instead I share with you something that has nothing to do with law, but that I always find entertaining…  the site of the best comic on the web.

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Daily Little Law Links

November 28th, 2009

A theme of people who probably should not have been caught is the thread today.

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Daily Little Law Links

November 27th, 2009
  • I was captivated by Sir Jeremy Greenstock’s testimony at the Iraq Inquiry today.  It really was a short lecture on customary international law.  The FT describes it well, but the full transcript is already online here.
  • The Police have had a troubled week. Firstly, The Guardian questions how essential stop-and-search was if it has now been reduced by a third.
  • Then, the National Audit Office released a report staying that solicitors suspect the police deter suspects from accessing their (free) services.
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Daily Little Law Links

November 26th, 2009
  • It seems that the hacker Gary McKinnon is about to illustrate why our one-sided extradition policy with the US as now seems certain to face trial in the US.
  • My favourite discussion with my criminal law lecturers was why NHS directors did not often face charges of corporate manslaughter.  Stories like this confirm my view.
  • Legal aid is an increasingly sensitive issue, but perhaps there would be more of it to go around if was administered properly.
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Daily Little Law Links

November 25th, 2009

I’ve already posted about the bank charges story – the rest of the media coverage just seemed to be a rather vague retelling. So, in other news:

  • Much is made of the future of legal advice in supermarkets.  Apparently they are preparing for this by sending staff to the police as civilian detectives.  Surely the admissibility of evidence comes into question at some point??
  • The press, having enjoyed the experience so much with MPs, seem to want to turn the attention to the judiciary. I may explore this in more detail in a later post, but I’ll leave you pondering if it is wise to add another deterrent to skilled barristers moving to the bench.
  • The Metropolitan Police have locked up a mentally ill man for refusing to hand over his encryption keys, as prescribed in the good old Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act.  I learned about the story from @AVerySecretBlog on Twitter.
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Bank Charges

November 25th, 2009

I will pad this out a little later, but for now the link to the decision is here.

As ever, nuance is lost on the press. The hope seems to lay in Lord Phillips’ point at para. 61:

As it is, if the Banks succeed on the narrow issue, this will not close the door on the OFT’s
investigations and may well not resolve the myriad cases that are currently stayed in
which customers have challenged Relevant Charges.

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Daily Little Law Links

November 24th, 2009

Students Edition

A short break from the news to bring you three items that have interested or alarmed me recently in student land.

  • Firstly, a mention of the LSE Law Careers Blog, which is excellent, up to date and has some interesting guest posts like this one from James Wakefield of Kaplan Law School.  I wish I was an LSE student!
  • Sadly however, I am closer to the part of the Higher Education sector that features in this article in which we learn that all of the London Met Board of Governors have been asked to “consider their position”. I may have misunderstood, but I think the intention is for that to be read as “we are so astounded by your incompetence and the betrayal of some of the most vulnerable students in higher education that we think you should be ashamed to show your faces in public ever again”. I could be mistaken.
  • Finally UCL, the first University in England founded on a secular basis and to admit men and women on equal terms, seems to be forgetting its legacy. It has invited a controversial Islamist preacher to speak on its campus. Having enjoyed many a beer (or other concoctions during the infamous “Fives”) at the UCL bars, I dare Mr Usamah to repeat his belief that:

” [a] woman, even if she gets a Phd, deficient. Her intellect is incomplete, deficient”

I learned about it from Sky’s Tim Marshall

UPDATE 25/11/09:  UCL have confirmed the event has now been cancelled.

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Daily Little Law Links

November 23rd, 2009
  • The most significant  political story of the next few weeks will be the start of the inquiry into the second Iraq War.  The briefings have begun.
  • The family of Jean Charles de Menezes have ended their litigation against the Metropolitan Police in return for compensation.
  • A straight (though why not mixed-sex to be consistent with the jargon?) couple will attempt to register for a civil partnership in Islington tomorrow. They expect to be rejected, as the legislation applies only to same-sex couples, and use the rejection to launch a challenge against what they argue is discriminatory legislation.
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Daily Little Law Links

November 22nd, 2009
  • MSPs are trying to cajole Westminster into giving them the power to lower the drink-drive limit in Scotland which sounds problematic both constitutionally, and for those unfortunate enough to straddle the the border.
  • On the Conservative’s website, Michael Howard tries to scare me out of voting for them by suggesting the repeal of the Human Rights Act.
  • I do enjoy reading Alastair Campbell’s blog, but it’s hard to make his writing fit within an legal issue most of the time.  Today is no exception, but as most of the TV news today used the story I do think he makes a lot of sense.
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